Mora Matassi and Pablo Boczkowski on the Rise of Incidental News Consumption

In this installment of the Distribution Matters podcast, Mora Matassi and Pablo Boczkowski talk to co-host Josh Braun about how young news consumers have begun not simply consuming, but “living in” the media—and the ramifications for journalism and the media industries. The study they discuss is co-authored with Eugenia Mitchelstein.

This episode’s theme music is “Electric Letter,” cc by sa 3.0 Free Music Archive user Learning Music.

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Lucas Graves and C.W. Anderson on how the “Share the Facts” Widget Shapes the Work of Fact-Checking Organizations

In this installment of the Distribution Matters podcast, Lucas Graves and C.W. Anderson talk to co-host Lucy Martirosyan about how the “Share the Facts” widget—a web tool aimed at helping to spread information online about the truth or falsehood of statements in the news—subtly shapes the working of the fact-checking organizations behind it.

This episode’s theme music is “Please Listen Carefully,” cc by sa 4.0 Free Music Archive user Jahzzar.

You can subscribe to this podcast via iTunes, Google Play, or RSS.

Raven Maragh and Tim Havens on Race and Media Personalization Online

In this installment of the Distribution Matters podcast, Raven Maragh and Tim Havens talk to co-host Lucy Martirosyan about their study—co-authored with Andrew High, Brian Ekdale, Huyen Le, and M. Zubair Shafiq—on how users’ race and views on race-related issues may affect what Google News chooses to show them.

This episode’s theme music is “Emerge,” cc by 3.0 ccMixter user Alex.

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Paper Submission Deadline Approaching

For those who are presenting, this note is a gentle reminder that the paper deadline for the preconference is two weeks away. If you’re a presenter, please submit your paper in PDF format to the organizers via the <distribution.matters.preconf AT gmail DOT com> email address by 25 April (one month before the event). As you adapt your abstract into a lengthier paper, please observe the following rules of thumb:

  •     Keep papers to between 2,000 and 8,000 words (all-inclusive); that word count should include a 150-word abstract.
  •     Write for colleagues from other scholarly traditions—avoid disciplinary jargon to the greatest extent possible.